For full functionality on this website it is necessary for a browser that supports JavaScript to be used. Please upgrade to browser that supports JavaScript to use all the features of this website.

Click here to find out more

This website uses cookies. We use cookies to give you the best experience. If you continue using our website, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on this website. Cookie Policy

World Wallet Wiki: Thai Baht

Name: Thai Baht

Also known as: THB

Currency Symbol: ฿

Denominations: ฿1 = 100 satang

 

Where is it used?

Thai Baht is used in Thailand.

Image for Image

What does it look like?

The Thai Baht comes in both coins and notes. Detailed descriptions of what these look like are listed below, so you know what to look out for.

 

Coins:

Thai coins can be rather confusing, partly because there is more than one design in circulation for each denomination. In addition to this, not all shops will accept certain coins – we’ll explain more of this below. The previous king of Thailand, Bhumibol Adulyadej, features on older coins. King Bhumibol Adulyadej died in 2016 and is succeeded by his son, King Maha Vajiralongkorn, who features on the newer coins.

  • 1, 5 & 10 satang
    Coins worth 1 satang, 5 satang, and 10 satang do exist, but are not in general circulation. Instead, they are used internally between banks. You are unlikely to come across any of these coins whilst there.
  • 25 satang

Version 1: Small (16mm diameter) gold-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Phra Mahathat temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 2: Small (16mm diameter) copper-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Phra Mahathat temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 3: Small (16mm diameter) copper-coloured coin with King Maha Vajiralongkorn on one side and his monogram on the other. Plain edged.

  • 50 satang

Version 1: Medium (18mm diameter) gold-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 2: Medium (18mm diameter) copper-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 3: Medium (18mm diameter) copper-coloured coin with King Maha Vajiralongkorn on one side and his monogram on the other. Plain edged.

  • 1 Baht

Version 1: Large (20mm diameter) silver-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Phra Kaew temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 2: Exactly the same look and features as above, except this coin is slightly lighter due to it being made with low-carbon steel.

Version 3: Large (20mm diameter) silver-coloured coin with King Maha Vajiralongkorn on one side and his monogram on the other. Plain edged.

  • 2 Baht

Version 1: Large (21.75mm diameter) silver-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Saket temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 2: Large (21.75mm diameter) gold-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Saket temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 3: Large (21.75mm diameter) gold-coloured coin with King Maha Vajiralongkorn on one side and his monogram on the other. Plain edged.

  • 5 Baht

Version 1: Large (24mm diameter) silver-coloured coin with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Benchamabophit temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 2: Exactly the same look and features as above, except this coin is slightly lighter.
Version 3: Large (24mm diameter) silver-coloured coin with King Maha Vajiralongkorn on one side and his monogram on the other. Plain edged.

  • 10 Baht

Version 1: Large (24mm diameter) bi-coloured coin (gold coloured centre and a silver coloured outer ring) with King Bhumibol Adulyadej on one side and Wat Arun temple on the other. Plain edged.

Version 2: Large (24mm diameter) bi-coloured coin (gold coloured centre and a silver coloured outer ring) with King Maha Vajiralongkorn on one side and his monogram on the other. Plain edged.

Notes:

Thai Baht banknotes go up in size the more they are worth, which is a handy feature in notes you’re unfamiliar with. However, only the width of the notes changes; the height stays the same. As with Thai coins, there is more than one version of each note in circulation, owing to the relatively recent change of monarch. Thankfully however, the colours used for each denomination remain the same, no matter which version you have.

  • 20 Baht

Version 1: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in military uniform on one side, and King Ananda Mahidol (ruled from 1935-1946) on the other.

Version 2: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in the Royal House of Chakri gown on one side, and King Ram Khamhaeng the Great (ruled from 1279-1298) on the other.

Version 3: Features King Maha Vajiralongkorn in military uniform on one side, and Kings Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke (ruled from 1782-1809) and Buddha Loetla Nabhalai (ruled from 1809-1824) on the other.

Colour: Green

  • 50 Baht

Version 1: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in military uniform on one side, and King Mongkut (ruled from 1851-1868) on the other.

Version 2: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in the Royal House of Chakri gown on one side, and King Naresuan the Great (ruled from 1590-1605) on the other.

Version 3: Features King Maha Vajiralongkorn in military uniform on one side, and Kings Nangklao (ruled from 1824-1851) and Mongkut (ruled from 1851-1868) on the other.

Colour: Blue

  • 100 Baht

Version 1: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in military uniform on one side, and Kings Chulalongkorn (ruled from 1868-1910) and Vajiravudh (ruled from 1910 - 1925) on the other.

Version 2: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in the Royal House of Chakri gown on one side, and King Taksin the Great (ruled from 1767-1782) on the other.

Version 3: Features King Maha Vajiralongkorn in military uniform on one side, and Kings Chulalongkorn (ruled from 1868-1910) and Vajiravudh (ruled from 1910 - 1925) on the other.

Colour: Red

  • 500 Baht

Version 1: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in military uniform on one side, and King Nangklao (ruled from 1824 - 1851) on the other.

Version 2: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in the Royal House of Chakri gown on one side, and King Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke the Great (ruled from 1782-1809) on the other.

Version 3: Features King Maha Vajiralongkorn in military uniform on one side, and Kings Prajadhipok (ruled from 1925-1935) and Ananda Mahidol (ruled from 1935 - 1946) on the other.

Colour: Purple

  • 1000 Baht

Version 1: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in military uniform on one side, and another image of him on the other side, along with an image of Pa Sak Jolasid Dam.

Version 2: Features King Bhumibol Adulyadej in the Royal House of Chakri gown on one side, and King Chulalongkorn the Great (ruled from 1868-1910) on the other.

Version 3: Features King Maha Vajiralongkorn in military uniform on one side, and Kings Bhumibol Adulyadej (ruled from 1946 – 2016) and Maha Vajiralongkorn (current King) on the other.

Colour: Brown

How much should I expect to spend?

Thailand’s capital Bangkok, as well as beaches and islands popular with tourists will be a little more expensive than other areas. Even with these mark ups on price, you’ll find Thailand a relatively cheap place to visit. Average prices at the time of writing are: (18th December)

  • Double-occupancy hotel room –฿2,036 (roughly £53)
  • Meals for one person, for one day – ฿476 (roughly £12-£13)
  • Bus/taxi fares average cost – ฿375 (roughly £10)
  • Bottled water – ฿51 (roughly £1.30)

Is it customary to barter and tip?

Bartering:

Haggling or bartering is common in Thailand and you will be expected to negotiate on price, unless you’re happy to pay over the odds for something. It’s likely you’ll be handed a calculator by the vendor with the price on it, which you’ll then type your offer into – ask for 50%-70% off initially, and expect the calculator to get passed back and forth a few times before you reach an agreement.

Haggling in Thailand is usually an upbeat situation and having a laugh and a joke with the vendor is often encouraged. It’s considered very embarrassing if someone gets angry or aggressive over bartering for goods, so keep it light.

Tipping:

Unlike haggling, tipping is not customary or widespread in Thailand and it will never be expected of you to leave a tip. In cases where you have received good service however, a small tip is likely to be very much appreciated. If you have had a good taxi journey, rounding up the fare is customary, particularly if the driver has helped you with any luggage.

Other customs to be aware of:

  • The Thai people have a great love for the late King Bhumibol and due to this it’s important to handle money very respectfully. Dropping money on the floor is considered rude and even stepping on a banknote to stop it from flying away would not be deemed acceptable behaviour.
  • Local vendors and smaller markets may not have a huge amount of change on them, so try to pay as close to the agreed price as possible. You can find plenty of change in supermarkets, so try to break larger notes here before heading to the more independent shops.
  • When haggling or even just out on the street, don’t point at anyone as it is considered very rude.
  • Always use your right hand to pass objects and money to someone else. The left hand is considered dirty and may cause great offence.